The Stanley Park Ghost Train

Contiuning in my series of posts about Halloween events around abouts where I live we come to the Stanley Park Ghost Train. Now, there are those who say it’s only an event for little children but you seen awful lot of adults traveling alone. It’s nostalgic for me at this point and every year they have a different theme.

So, below is a gallery of some of my favorite photos over many years worth of visits. Please note the photos are taken from a cellphone camera on a very wobby train in the dark.

Fright Nights @ PNE 2019

Now, when it comes to events in British Columbia, Canada where I live often gets the shaft. Our Fan Expo isn’t even compatible to Toronto’s and our yearly exhibition, the PNE is also not even comparable in size and scope to Ontario. However, I do still love the PNE and one other even they have yearly is Fright Nights! A collection of haunted houses, a freak show and lot of different carnival rides.

Memory

So do we pass the ghosts that haunt us later in our lives; they sit undramatically by the roadside like poor beggars, and we see them only from the corners of our eyes, if we see them at all. The idea that they have been waiting there for us rarely crosses our minds. Yet they do wait, and when we have passed, they gather up their bundles of memory and fall in behind, treading in our footsteps and catching up, little by little.

— Stephen King

Resizing LVM

Linux-logo-8EC59678CB-seeklogo.com

Many years ago now stumbling across this information was very useful to me. I figure now that unless it’s passed on again, with my own additional notes, how is the next person going to find it?

One of the great things about installing Linux with LVM (Logical Volume Manager) is that it is ridiculously easy to increase space on a virtual machine. On the platform of your choice add an additional HDD to the virtual machine and then follow these steps:

First, you need to be sure the system sees the new HDD that has been added. In this example, it is /dev/sdb.

fdisk -l
 
Disk /dev/sda: 42.9 GB, 42949672960 bytes
 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 5221 cylinders
 Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
 
Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
 /dev/sda1 * 1 666 5345248+ 83 Linux
 Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
 /dev/sda2 666 5222 36596736 8e Linux LVM

Now that we know /dev/sdb has been found and is the size we expect:

pvcreate /dev/sdb
 Writing physical volume data to disk "/dev/sdb1"
 Physical volume "/dev/sdb1" successfully created

Use the vgs command find out the name of your volume group and then extend it to /dev/sdb:

vgs

VG #PV #LV #SN Attr VSize VFree
vg00 3 10 0 wz--n- 113.91g 34.97g

vgextend vg00 /dev/sdb
Volume group "vg00" successfully extended

Going down the line the next one up is to extend the logical volume:

lvs

LV VG Attr LSize Origin Snap% Move Log Copy% Convert
LogVol00 vg00 -wi-ao 29.06G
LogVol01 vg00 -wi-ao 5.81G 

lvextend -l +100%FREE /dev/vg00/LogVol00vg
Extending logical volume LogVol00 to 49.03 GB
Logical volume LogVol00 successfully resized

Make sure that it sees all the space properly:

lvs

LV VG Attr LSize Origin Snap% Move Log Copy% Convert
LogVol00 vg00 -wi-ao 49.03G
LogVol01 vg00 -wi-ao 5.81G

Now we need to extend the actual filesystem itself and which path you choose depends if your running RHEL/CentOS 6.x or 7.x

For 6.x you would run:

resize2fs /dev/mapper/LogVol-vg00

For 6.x you would run:

xfs_growfx /dev/mapper/LogVol-vg00

This part can take a few seconds, minutes or longer depending upon the size you are undertaking and activity on the server. Again, if this is a highly active server you are going to need a maintenance window, do not try this during the day.